Internal Medicine Residents | Icahn School of Medicine (2022)

The residents of the Mount Sinai Internal Medicine Residency Program are truly what make our program shine. Our trainees come from all over, representing many of the best medical schools throughout the United States and the world. Prior to residency, many already are leaders in biotechnology, translational research, genomics, primary care and public health.

Our newest intern class, for example, has distinguished themselves in many impressive ways:

  • An MD/PhD from Northwestern whose graduate work investigated novel stimulators of immune checkpoint inhibition n both prostate and lung adenocarcinoma, resulting in multiple first-author publications;
  • An MD from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai who has worked with Michelle Kim in the Division of Gastroenterology on an investigation of the prognostic power of the recently updated cancer staging classification for midgut neuroendocrine tumors;
  • An MD from Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School who worked on a project to address health biases faced by adolescents in Newark, NJ, ultimately creating an effective youth development curriculum to be propagated on a national scale;
  • An MD from the University of Buffalo who studied the long-term clinical outcomes of patients with a history of radiation exposure who underwent transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR);
  • An MD/PhD from the University of Washington whose research involved experimental and computational approaches to characterize genes unique to the human species, born through the process of gene duplication, at both the genomic and transcriptomic levels, which will be used in the future for interpreting disease-associated variations in gene families.
Chief Residents

Four residents are chosen annually to stay an additional year as chief residents. These chief residents, in conjunction with the Program Director, work closely with the chair and the vice chairs of the Department of Medicine and provide leadership throughout the residency training program. They are the liaison between the day-to-day workings of the house officers, the administration of the department, and the various hospitals. They have significant teaching responsibilities and are expected to be future leaders in medicine.

The 2021-22 Chief Residents are:

Emily Leven, MD:
Emily Leven grew up in New Jersey and earned her undergraduate degree in Criminology from the University of Pennsylvania. She attended medical school at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and completed internal medicine residency at the Mount Sinai Hospital as a member of the Healthcare Leadership Track. She plans to pursue fellowship training in gastroenterology.

Anna Liang, MD:
Anna Liang was born and raised in Brooklyn, New York (that is, the pre-Smorgasburg Brooklyn). She went on to traveling to the corners of New York City, where she completed her undergraduate training at The Macaulay Honors College at the Brooklyn College campus. Like Peter and Emily, Anna completed her undergraduate medical studies at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, then her internal medicine residency at Mount Sinai Hospital under the Medical Education track. She plans on a career as a clinician-educator in geriatrics and palliative medicine.

Adam Russak, MD:
Adam Russak was born and raised in Los Angeles, California. He earned undergraduate degrees in Applied Mathematics and Biology at the University of Rochester, where he also completed his medical school training. During his residency at Mount Sinai Hospital, he completed the Medical Education Track and the Health Care Leadership Track (HLT). He currently serves as a Chief Resident for Education. Adam is pursuing cardiology fellowship, and his research focuses on the application of artificial intelligence and machine learning to cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology.

Daniel Slack, MD:
Daniel Slack grew up in Maryland and earned his undergraduate degrees in Biology and Psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. He attended medical school at University of Maryland and completed his residency at the Mount Sinai Hospital. Daniel currently serves as one of the Chief Residents in the Department of Medicine and plans to pursue a fellowship in endocrinology, with an interest in medical education and reducing health disparities.

Peter Ting, MD:
Peter Ting grew up in New Jersey and earned his undergraduate degree in Chemistry at the University of Rochester. He then came to Mount Sinai Hospital for medical school and stayed for residency. He was a member of the Medical Education track and is interested in pursuing a career in medical education. He is applying to cardiology fellowship with the goal of subspecializing in advanced heart failure.

Hamna Zafar, MD:
Hamna Zafar grew up in Brooklyn, NY and earned her undergraduate degree in Pharmacology at Stony Brook University. She attended Temple medical school where she developed an interest in advocacy of underserved and marginalized populations. She was a member of the primary care track, which she found to be the perfect avenue to foster this interest. She is applying to pulmonary and critical care fellowship and hopes to continue to serve as an advocate for these populations.

PGY3

The members of our PGY3 class, 2021-22:

PGY-3

School

Arman, Farid

Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences

Basist, Madeleine

Rutgers-RWJ

Beerkens, Frans

Georgetown

Bowman-Zamora, Chip

Columbia

Chesner, Jaclyn

Drexel

Draper, Lindsey

University of Maryland

Du, Charles

University of Chicago

Eswarappa, Meghana

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Evans, Michelle

Thomas Jefferson

Farrell, Douglas

Rutgers-RWJ

Fiter, Ryan

Albert Einstein

Fu, Yichun

Columbia

Greenberg, Garred

Albert Einstein

Jordan, Robyn

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Kaur, Sukhbir

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Kocovic, Nikola

Thomas Jefferson

Koppel, Jonathan

Quinnipiac University

Li, Emily

Northwestern University

Mathew, Sheryl

Drexel

Mazori, Alon

Albert Einstein

Mendoza, Dorian

University of Texas-Southwestern

Miodownik, Hope

Albert Einstein

Mitchell, William

Albert Einstein

Mtisi, Tafadzwa

New York Medical College

Nagorna, Agnieszka

Albert Einstein

Nelson, Kyle

Rutgers-RWJ

Owens, Amanda

Stony Brook

(Video) How to do an Internal Medicine Admission Step-by-Step (for residents and medical students)

Park, Sarah

Albert Einstein

Philippou, Alicia

Albert Einstein

Pulaski, Matthew

Rutgers-NJMS

Qing, Danielle

Hofstra/ Northwell

Rahman, Karishma

NYU

Razuk, Victor

Rutgers-RWJ

Rippel, Noa

Sackler

Shaik, Aleesha

Drexel

Sharma, Rajal

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Shpiner, Aaron

Tufts

Singh, Ranbir

Rutgers-NJMS

Sperling, Dylan

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Wotman, Michael

Hofstra/ Northwell

Zhao, Connie

Harvard

Zomorodi, Rustin

Case Western

PGY2

Our PGY2s for 2021-22:

PGY-2

School

Allyn, Katherine

Albert Einstein

Alter, Aviv

Rutgers—RWJ

Anderson, Justine

New York Medical College

Anker, Jonathan

Northwestern

Blumfield, Amit

Albert Einstein

Casasanta, Nicole

George Washington

Ceravolo, Amanda

Weill Cornell

Cytryn, Edward

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Davis, Keithara

Duke

Delicce, Anthony

Hofstra/Northwell

Dougherty, Max

University of Washington

Edens, Madison

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Feldman, Daniel

Rutgers—RWJ

Golec, Sophia

Case Western

Goodman, Morgan

Keck SOM at USC

Goulart, Hannah

George Washington

Gutowski, Emily

Harvard

Hayashi, Emi

Case Western

Hsia, Brian

Albert Einstein

Iyer, Divya

University of Connecticut

(Video) Must-Have Med Apps For Medicine Residents *Internal Medicine Residency Boot Camp with Dr. Aksiniya*

Jones, Brent

Albert Einstein

Kononenko, Mariya

New York Medical College

Lawrence, Rebecca

Jefferson

Mathew, Alvin

Rutgers—NJMS

McInerney Perez-Benzo, Grace

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Mekhaimar, Menatalla

Weill Cornell—Qatar

Metzger, Megan

Rutgers—NJMS

Mihalache, Diana

Tufts

Needelman, Brandon

University of Miami

Nussbaum, Sarah

University of Chicago

Patel, Richa

Rutgers—NJMS

Rao, Aarti

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Ray, Justina

SUNY Downstate

Rosa, Tracey

Albert Einstein

Rudshteyn, Michelle

Rutgers—NJMS

Santiago Pichardo, Gabriela

CUNY School of Medicine

Satish, Mohanchandran

Creighton University

Saung, Wint Thu

Emory

Sharma, Ashutosh

University of Buffalo

Shyu, Margaret

Northwestern

Stauber, Zachary

Tulane

Thomas, Dave

Hofstra/Northwell

Wang, Denise

Drexel

Wilson, Carlie

Temple

Yang, Jeong Yun

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Zhang, Jimmy

University of Rochester

PGY1

The members of our intern class, 2021-22:

PGY-1

School

Ahmed, Taqwa

CUNY School of Medicine

Aquino, Gabrielle

George Washington

Ash, Nathaniel

Thomas Jefferson

Balac, Nina

Keck SOM at USC

Bhatta, Manasa

Vanderbilt

Brewer, Marlon

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Cangialosi, Peter

Rutgers-NJMS

Castro, Rebecca

New York Medical College

Coritsidis, Alexandra

(Video) Division of Medical Genetics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Stony Brook

Dalsania, Ankur

Rutgers-NJMS

D'Andrea, Megan

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Darwish, Christina

George Washington

Das, Rachita

University of Miami

Desland, Fiona

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Dharia, Ishaan

George Washington

Estriplet, Marc

Rutgers-NJMS

Ezratty, Charlotte

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Frousios, Ritsa

Eastern Virginia Medical School

Glamour, Benita

Case Western

Gronowitz, Mitchell

Albert Einstein

Hossain, Marouf

Albert Einstein

Kelkar, Janhawi

Quinnipiac

Kirsch, Yonina

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Lee, Angela

Dartmouth

Lew, Dana

Sackler

Lieto, Stephen

Rutgers—RWJ

Mueller, David

Boston University

Mui, Brandon

Albert Einstein

Nguyen, Jayne

UCSD

Nussbaum, Jeremy

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Psonis, John

Stony Brook

Rajagopal, Madhumitha

Albert Einstein

Requijo, Tatiana

Cornell

Sangmo, Lodoe

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Sastow, Dahniel

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Scalzo, Nicholas

New York Medical College

Schmidt, Natalia

University of Virginia

Seth, Shivani

University of Vermont

Shimkus, Mary

Columbia

Sidhom, John William

John Hopkins

Singh, Supreet

Rutgers-NJMS

Sohval, Sophie

Albert Einstein

Soumare, Aminata

Tufts

Subramaniam, Varsha

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Thapi, Sahityasri

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Treacy, Taylor

Thomas Jefferson

Upadhyay, Ranjan

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

(Video) Johns Hopkins Bayview Internal Medicine Residency

Vasquez, Cladimar

CUNY School of Medicine

Wharton, Robert

University of Virginia

Whitney, Matilda

Drexel

Zaret, Dina

Thomas Jefferson

Zhang, Joyce

Drexel

Our Neurology Prelims for 2021-22:

PGY1

School

Kiefer, Luke

Creighton University

Loebel, Emma

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Patel, Nikunj

Albert Einstein

Polineni, Sai

University of Miami

Rubin, Todd

Albert Einstein

Williams, Masrai

Icahn SOM at Mount Sinai

Yi, Cameron

Dartmouth

Zbrzeski, Claudia

Albany Medical College

Our Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Prelims for 2021-22:

PGY1

School

Kalbian, Irene

Thomas Jefferson

Lewis, Caroline

University of Illinois

O'Connor, Ian

Georgetown

Owens, Morgen

University of Alabama

Weng, Daniel

Johns Hopkins

Recent Graduates

Most graduates from our residency program go on to pursue fellowship in a subspecialty or practice in Internal Medicine/primary care or hospital medicine. They are highly sought after and compete for the top spots throughout the country. Read more to learn about where our graduates have gone and the leadership positions they have in the world of academic medicine.

Resident Life

The Internal Medicine Residency Program at Mount Sinai is designed to foster a team approach to patient care and learning. An essential component of that is creating an environment of friendship, camaraderie and well-being among residents and between residents and faculty. While the demands of residency can be intense at times, residents are always pleasantly surprised to discover that life does not need to stop during their training. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, there were numerous social activities for housestaff, as well as their spouses, family and friends. These include attending New York Yankees games, Knicks games, karaoke and bowling nights, "Switch" Parties at the end of each block and the Annual Housestaff Follies. We look forward to resuming these activities again when it is safe to do so.

Housestaff Council

The Department of Medicine Housestaff Council is a peer-elected body composed of house officers that serve as advocates for the residents. The council meets on a monthly basis to discuss resident-related issues regarding work environment, education and morale. The Housestaff Council collaborates with the program director, the administration and the chief residents on numerous projects throughout the year. In addition, the Housestaff Council assists and organizes social events including happy hours and orientation events for incoming residents. The Department of Medicine Housestaff Council sends representatives to the interdepartmental housestaff council to discuss hospital-wide concerns.

Housing

Mount Sinai owns several apartment buildings in the vicinity of the hospital, which are used for professional housing. Household size is a factor in determining housing assignments. Accommodations include furnished bedrooms in shared suites in the Residence Hall, as well as studios and one- and two-bedroom apartments. All are located in proximity to the hospital.

Incoming residents are eligible to apply for Mount Sinai housing. Housing offers are based on a lottery system in which applications are divided into three categories: incoming families, incoming couples and incoming singles. Each applicant will receive a housing offer based on their randomly assigned lottery number and top 10 choices.

Living in New York City

As one of the most influential and iconic cities in the world, New York offers nearly anything that you can possibly imagine. Whether you are interested in the post-modern collections at the Museum of Modern Art, the newest Broadway hit, the latest fashion trend or the independent film industry, New York boasts an array of culture every night. And for the adventuresome foodie or indie rocker, the city bursts with a new crop of restaurants and musical acts on nearly a weekly basis. Each neighborhood offers a different flavor and feel and if you grow tired of Manhattan, the outer boroughs can provide a year’s worth of activities. Mount Sinai’s Recreation Office provides discounts and other special offers to residents.

Benefits

Mount Sinai provides health coverage for house officers through Mount Sinai - UnitedHealth, and we make available choices of alternative health coverage through several other HMOs. Cost sharing is available if you desire family coverage. Additional benefits offered at Mount Sinai include:

  • Basic dental coverage, a prescription drug plan, and a vision plan at no cost to the house officer
  • Enhanced dental plans and family coverage available with a cost-sharing deductible
  • Short- and long-term disability, workers' compensation, life insurance, and accidental death and dismemberment insurance for our house officers
  • Dependent care and tax-sheltered annuity plans
  • Malpractice insurance is covered for all residents

Salaries by Year

PGY

Salary

PGY1

$70,876

PGY2

$73,711

PGY3

$76,660


Vacations

In recognition of the heavy clinical demands on residents, vacations are considered an essential component of the schedule. Residents receive four weeks of vacation per year. While every effort is made to provide vacations that accommodate individual needs and preferences, time for vacation is scheduled based on the clinical needs of the department.

Travel Stipends

The department also supports resident travel to clinical and research meetings for the presentation of papers and research results carried out in conjunction with faculty. Stipend includes domestic coach air travel, meeting registration and per diem expenses.

FAQs

What is the best residency program for internal medicine? ›

Here are the Best Internal Medicine Programs
  • Johns Hopkins University.
  • Harvard University.
  • University of California--San Francisco.
  • University of Pennsylvania (Perelman)
  • Duke University.
  • Columbia University.
  • University of Michigan--Ann Arbor.
  • Washington University in St. Louis.

How many years of residency is internal medicine? ›

Basic training in internal medicine is three years of residency (termed 'categorical' training) following medical school. Following completion of three years of training, residents are eligible for board certification in internal medicine.

How hard is it to get into internal medicine residency? ›

For example, despite the fact that Internal Medicine is categorized as a “less competitive” specialty, the most highly respected and renowned Internal Medicine residency programs are highly competitive and therefore difficult to get into. Exceptions in the opposite direction generally do not hold up as well.

Is internal medicine competitive for IMG? ›

The primary care specialties—family medicine, internal medicine, and pediatrics—are generally considered the most IMG-friendly because they are the least competitive specialties to match into.

Is internal medicine a hard specialty? ›

But internal medicine is more difficult than other specialties to categorize and nail down because it's so broad and expansive in what you can do with it. There are also more fellowship options after internal medicine than just about any other specialty, which we'll get to shortly.

How much do internal medicine residents make? ›

Salary Ranges for Internal Medicine Residents

The salaries of Internal Medicine Residents in the US range from $43,500 to $187,200 , with a median salary of $57,826 . The middle 50% of Internal Medicine Residents makes between $53,310 and $57,820, with the top 83% making $187,200.

What is the shortest medical residency? ›

The shortest residency training programs are three years and the longest are seven. After residency training, some people pursue fellowship training which can range in length from one to three years, on average.

Do you get paid during residency? ›

The average first-year resident physician makes about $60,000, and there's not much wiggle room. Resident salaries are determined by an institution and correlate with training year rather than specialty.

Can you work as a doctor without residency? ›

Examples of career options for doctors without residency include working in the medical-legal field, teaching, or working in the pharmaceutical or insurance industry. Entry into any of these fields requires some planning and action.

What is the hardest doctor to become? ›

Apart from the top 5 specialties mentioned above, Interventional Radiology, Radiation Oncology, Vascular Surgery, General Surgery and Med/Peds are among the most difficult domains to become a doctor.

How many hours a week do im residents work? ›

Residents work 40–80 hours a week depending on specialty and rotation within the specialty, with residents occasionally logging 136 (out of 168) hours in a week.

Is residency harder than medical school? ›

Clinical grades are usually based on a curve such that only a small percentage of the class can earn them, meaning you have to outshine your colleagues. In this regard, medical school is much more stressful than residency.

What is the easiest residency to match into? ›

The following medical specialties are those that ranked the lowest and are, therefore, the easiest to match into, relatively speaking.
...
The 10 Least Competitive Specialties in Medicine
  • Family Medicine.
  • Pediatrics.
  • Psychiatry.
  • Emergency Medicine.
  • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.
  • Neurology.
  • Child Neurology.
  • Pathology.
10 Sept 2022

Which states are most IMG friendly? ›

Based on the 2022 NRMP Main Residency Match®: Match Rates by Specialty and State study, the Top 12 Most IMG Friendly States from Match 2022 are:
  • New York (1478)
  • Florida (578)
  • Pennsylvania (538)
  • Michigan (536)
  • New Jersey (489)
  • Texas (459)
  • California (408)
  • Ohio (348)
13 Jun 2022

What is the hardest medical specialty? ›

1. Plastic/ Reconstructive Surgery: According to our research, plastic surgery is the hardest specialty. Plastic surgeons specialize in soft tissue such as skin, muscle, and fat rather than bones, which are the domain of orthopedic surgeons.

What is the toughest aspect of internal medicine? ›

The most challenging and rewarding aspects of internal medicine: Internal medicine patients tend to be older and sicker, with multiple medical problems and often significant social and psychologic challenges as well.

How competitive is an internal medicine residency? ›

The top internal medicine programs are very competitive so it is important to understand what your target programs will be. The vast majority of U.S. allopathic seniors match in internal medicine, but, the specialty remains competitive for international and osteopathic applicants.

What is a good step 1 score for internal medicine? ›

Generally speaking, however, a USMLE® Step 1 score between 230 and 245 is considered a good and a score between 245 and 255 is considered very good.
...
What is a Good Step 1 Score?
SpecialtyStep 1 score rangePercentage of first-year residents matched in this range in 2020
Internal medicine220–24957.7%
3 more rows

How many hours a week do internal medicine residents work? ›

How many hours will you REALLY work? What's the weekly workload in terms of hours worked during an Internal Medicine residency? According to studies and resident reports, 70-80 hours per week during hospital rotations and 40-50 hours per week on outpatient clinic rotations is normal for this type of residency.

Is a resident a real doctor? ›

Residents are doctors in training. They have graduated from medical school, been awarded an M.D. degree, and now are training to be a particular type of doctor — such as a pediatrician or pediatric specialist, or a type of surgeon. In their first year of such training, residents are sometimes called interns.

Which residency pays the most? ›

What are the highest paid residencies in the US? Allergy & immunology, hematology, medical geneticists, rheumatology, and most forms of specialized surgery top the list. However, it's important to remember that these are subspecialty residencies, aka fellowships, and so are effectively PGY4+ residencies.

What kind of doctor works the least hours? ›

Of note, allergy and immunology physicians also spend the least amount of time on paperwork and administrative tasks out of any specialty on our list at just 14.6 hours per week. For perspective, this is a similar amount of time to dermatology which is known for being one of the best lifestyle specialties.

What doctor has the longest residency? ›

The length of residency depends on the field a graduate chooses to take. Medical specialties such as family medicine and internal medicine often require three years, whereas surgery usually requires 5-7 years of training, and neurological surgery is the longest at 7 years.

What doctor takes the least amount of school? ›

A general practice doctor is probably the easiest doctor to become. Even though students must complete four years of medical school and one or two years of a residency, this is the minimum amount of education required for medical doctors.

Is 30 too old for medical school? ›

Yes, medical schools do accept older students. According to medical school admissions specialists, it is certainly possible for someone age 30 or over to be accepted into med school.

What comes after residency? ›

Once a resident finishes their residency, they are considered an attending physician. The attending physician is in charge of the whole medical team- including the residents, intern, and medical student.

How do med school students make money? ›

Find local schools and libraries in your area and start advertising your services and what subjects you can tutor. You could also tutor your fellow classmates in your medical school! You can contract through an education company and they will connect you with people who are seeking tutors.

Can you fail residency? ›

Residents have, in fact, been terminated from residency, and threatened with the loss of career, because they called programs on rules violations, or complained about a program's behavior, or posted on this site. There are well documented cases of this. So it's pretty much the same as in the real world.

What can you do with an MD but no residency? ›

8 Jobs After Medical School Without Residency
  • Technical/Medical Writing. ...
  • Medical Research Scientist. ...
  • Health Insurance. ...
  • Post-Secondary Medical Instruction. ...
  • Medical and Health Services Management. ...
  • Physician Assistant. ...
  • Medical Consulting. ...
  • Medical Science Liaison.
3 May 2022

What happens if you get kicked out of residency? ›

After termination or resignation, you will most likely be unable to work in the specialty that you trained in since you have not yet finished residency and are not board eligible. Despite hitting this major road block, you must finish residency to optimize your earning potential and to advance in your career.

What is the easiest type of doctor to become? ›

Least Competitive Medical Specialties
  1. Family Medicine. Average Step 1 Score: 215.5. ...
  2. Psychiatry. Average Step 1 Score: 222.8. ...
  3. Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Average Step 1 Score: 224.2. ...
  4. Pediatrics. Average Step 1 Score: 225.4. ...
  5. Pathology. Average Step 1 Score: 225.6. ...
  6. Internal Medicine (Categorical)
20 May 2021

What is the least competitive medical specialty? ›

With that in mind, the five least competitive medical specialties are:
  • Family medicine.
  • Physical medicine and rehabilitation.
  • Anesthesiology.
  • Pediatrics.
  • Psychiatry.
15 Jun 2020

What are the highest paying doctors? ›

RELATED: The list of the top 10 highest physician salaries by specialty for 2019
  • Neurosurgery — $746,544.
  • Thoracic surgery — $668,350.
  • Orthopedic surgery — $605,330.
  • Plastic surgery — $539,208.
  • Oral and maxillofacial — $538,590.
  • Vascular surgery — $534,508.
  • Cardiology — $527,231.
  • Radiation oncology — $516,016.

Do medical residents get days off? ›

Residency programs typically offer between two and four weeks of vacation, with the flexibility to schedule them increasing as residents advance in their training. We spoke with residents about how they make the most of their extended time away from the hospital and clinic.

What is the longest shift a resident can work? ›

In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) implemented rules limiting work hours for all residents, with the key components being that residents should work no more than 80 hours per week or 24 consecutive hours on duty, should not be "on-call" more than every third night, and should have ...

Do residents stay at the same hospital? ›

You match into a residency at a specific hospital or university or other med center. Hospitals may be private, community, large nonprofit or academic. In large cities/urban areas, residents may end up rotating through multiple hospitals across town.

How many medical residents drop out? ›

The total national attrition rate remained relatively stable at an average of 3.3% over those 20 years. Additionally, attrition rates appeared to vary by type of degree program.

Does life get better after medical residency? ›

Residents and fellows around the country have bought into the “medical training myth.” The myth states: “Life will get so much better when I finish residency/fellowship.” Sadly, too many house staff buy into this false belief and experience tremendous letdown when they graduate.

Is medical residency fun? ›

Residency training is exciting and challenging because you get to practice what you studied for. However, the working hours can really get tough especially during your beginning years as you get to adjust with the setup.

What is the least competitive medical school? ›

15 Least Competitive Medical (MD)or Easiest Schools Based on Median Accepted GPA
SchoolMedian GPAMCAT
Meharry Medical College, TN3.46503
Morehouse School of Medicine, GA3.68506
New York Medical College, NY3.70514
Rush Medical College of Rush University Medical Center, IL3.70511
11 more rows
14 Jul 2022

What happens if you dont match medical school? ›

Those who do not match in the initial Main Residency Match can apply for the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP). There are three SOAP rounds during Match week, in which unmatched students and residency programs can connect, and many applicants are placed into residencies this way.

How many residency programs should you apply to? ›

We recommend being more strategic and applying to no more than 30-35 programs, at most. The “ideal” range could be from 15 to 35, though it's important to remember that there is no actual universally applicable “ideal” number of residency programs to apply to.

How do I increase my chances of a residency match? ›

To increase your chances of matching, you should research each program's IMG-match rates and overall match rates. If you're applying for residency as an older applicant, meaning you graduated medical school more than five years ago, you should also look at the age trends among current program residents.

How long is internal medicine residency in USA? ›

Basic training in internal medicine is three years of residency (termed 'categorical' training) following medical school. Following completion of three years of training, residents are eligible for board certification in internal medicine.

How many programs should I apply to for residency IMG? ›

According to our research, even the strongest IMG applicant needs to apply to at least 80 programs to have a good probability of a successful match. Mid applicants may need to apply to 120-150 programs.

What is the happiest medical specialty? ›

Here is our list of the top 10 happiest doctor specialties according to work-life balance:
  • Family Medicine.
  • Otolaryngology.
  • Dermatology.
  • Anesthesiology.
  • Ophthalmology.
  • Pediatrics.
  • Psychiatry.
  • Clinical Immunology/Allergy.
9 Jun 2022

Which medical specialty has the highest burnout rate? ›

Emergency medicine physicians have the highest rates of burnout among all physician specialties, according to a Medscape's 2022 Physician Burnout and Depression report.

What is the hardest residency to get into? ›

Competitive programs that are the most difficult to match into include:
  • General Surgery.
  • Neurosurgery.
  • Orthopedic Surgery.
  • Ophthalmology.
  • Otolaryngology.
  • Plastic Surgery.
  • Urology.
  • Radiation Oncology.

Which residency programs are most competitive? ›

Most Competitive Residency Programs Based on Fill-Rate
  • Medicine - Emergency Medicine. ...
  • Neurological Surgery. ...
  • Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. ...
  • Integrated Plastic Surgery. ...
  • Thoracic Surgery.
24 May 2022

How many internal medicine residency programs should I apply to? ›

How many programs should I apply to? All students should apply to at least 12 programs. Some students will need to apply to more. Your assigned DOM advisor will help you figure out the number of programs you need to apply to.

What is a good step 1 score for internal medicine? ›

Generally speaking, however, a USMLE® Step 1 score between 230 and 245 is considered a good and a score between 245 and 255 is considered very good.
...
What is a Good Step 1 Score?
SpecialtyStep 1 score rangePercentage of first-year residents matched in this range in 2020
Internal medicine220–24957.7%
3 more rows

How many hours a week do internal medicine residents work? ›

How many hours will you REALLY work? What's the weekly workload in terms of hours worked during an Internal Medicine residency? According to studies and resident reports, 70-80 hours per week during hospital rotations and 40-50 hours per week on outpatient clinic rotations is normal for this type of residency.

Who are the happiest doctors? ›

The Happiest Doctors

Rheumatologists -- specialists in arthritis, joints, muscles, and bones -- topped the list with an average self-reported happiness rating of 4.09. They were followed closely by dermatologists (4.06), urologists (4.04), ophthalmologists (4.03), and emergency medicine doctors (4.01).

What is the hardest field of medicine? ›

1. Plastic/ Reconstructive Surgery: According to our research, plastic surgery is the hardest specialty. Plastic surgeons specialize in soft tissue such as skin, muscle, and fat rather than bones, which are the domain of orthopedic surgeons.

Which medical residency is the hardest? ›

What Are the Most Competitive Medical Residencies in the United States?
  • #1: Orthopedic Surgery Overall Score: 28. ...
  • #2: Neurological Surgery Overall Score: 27. ...
  • #3: Plastic Surgery Overall Score: 26. ...
  • #4: Otolaryngology Overall Score: 25. ...
  • #5: Dermatology Overall Score: 24. ...
  • #6: Radiation Oncology Overall Score: 23.
25 Jan 2020

Does it matter when you interview for residency? ›

Of all of the interviewees participating in the match, nearly all matched into a program somewhere, with no significant difference based on interview timing. Conclusions: When considering all of the interviewees, interview date showed no major influence on matching.

How many letters do you need for IM residency? ›

How many letters of recommendation do I need for the residency application? You need at least three letters of recommendation per residency, and you can submit up to four per residency.

Is residency harder than medical school? ›

Clinical grades are usually based on a curve such that only a small percentage of the class can earn them, meaning you have to outshine your colleagues. In this regard, medical school is much more stressful than residency.

How competitive is an internal medicine residency? ›

The top internal medicine programs are very competitive so it is important to understand what your target programs will be. The vast majority of U.S. allopathic seniors match in internal medicine, but, the specialty remains competitive for international and osteopathic applicants.

What is the easiest specialties in medicine? ›

The following 6 medical specialties are those that ranked lowest, and are therefore the easiest to match into, relatively speaking.
...
The 6 least competitive medical specialties are:
  • Family Medicine.
  • Pediatrics.
  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.
  • Psychiatry.
  • Anesthesiology.
  • Emergency Medicine.
14 Jun 2021

How many hours do residents sleep? ›

According to a study of 4,510 obstetric-gynecologic residents, 71.3% reported sleeping less than 3 hours while on night call. In a survey of 3,604 first- and second-year residents, 20% reported sleeping an average of 5 hours or less per night, and 66% averaged 6 hours or less per night.

Do residents get days off? ›

Residency programs typically offer between two and four weeks of vacation, with the flexibility to schedule them increasing as residents advance in their training. We spoke with residents about how they make the most of their extended time away from the hospital and clinic.

Do you get paid during residency? ›

The average first-year resident physician makes about $60,000, and there's not much wiggle room. Resident salaries are determined by an institution and correlate with training year rather than specialty.

Videos

1. University of Wisconsin Internal Medicine Residency Program: "They Believed in Me"
(UW Department of Medicine)
2. EVMS Internal Medicine Residency Program
(Eastern Virginia Medical School)
3. Internal Medicine Residency at Temple: Meet Our Chief Residents 2021
(Temple Graduate Medical Education)
4. Day in the Life - Internal Medicine Intern [Ep. 17]
(Kevin Jubbal, M.D.)
5. Welcome to Penn Medicine Graduate Medical Education (GME)
(Penn Medicine)
6. KENDRICK LAMAR - HUMBLE (INTERNAL MEDICINE RESIDENCY PARODY)
(You I Am)

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